Tag Archives: around the world in 80 Dolphies

AW80D: Moscow, Russia

After a long hiatus from his world travels, during which he enjoyed the beautiful Seattle summer, Dolphie is visiting Moscow, the capital of Russia. For almost 1,000 years, this city on the banks of the Moskva River (from which its name is derived), has served, on and off, as a political and power center in the area we now call Russia.

Dosphie & St. Basil's Cathedral

Here, Dolphie is visiting The Cathedral of Vasily the Blessed, also known as St. Basil’s Cathedral. The cathedral was built in the mid-16th century in honor of the capture of Kazan and Astrakhan. (Doesn’t that sound just a bit like something from a Harry Potter book? Harry Potter and the Capture of Astrakhan! On a tangent here, many made-up words and names in English fantasy novels are based on other languages. For example, J.R.R. Tolkien drew inspiration for one of his Elven languages from Finnish. Perhaps J.K. Rowling looked to Slavic languages for some of her names.)

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: London Part 2

All the Pretty Houses London is truly one of the world’s great cities. Its history reaches back about 6,500 years, and today is a center of the arts, global finance, fashion, education—almost everything. It is remarkably diverse, home to people representing countries all around the earth.

A city that draws cultures of the world to it? Where you can experience not only local customs and food, but also those from scores of other countries? That sounds like a great place for a study abroad program.

And that’s exactly why, every other year, Shoreline sends students there. This past fall quarter, two Shoreline students were there. Your next opportunity to follow in Dolphie’s footsteps will be fall quarter 2016. It’s never too early to start planning for your study abroad adventures (especially if you want scholarships): if you’re interested, contact us at studyabroad@shoreline.edu!

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(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

Croatia: Game of Thrones Edition

By Bracodbk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Bracodbk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Anybody remember this picture from our AW80D post on Croatia? Or do you perhaps remember it from somewhere else… maybe something you saw on Sunday night?

Yes! A shot from the most recent episode of Game of Thrones basically recreated this photo. This isn’t even close to the first time that the city has appeared in the show, though. According to roughguides.com, Dubrovnik, Croatia (the city in the photo) has been used as the setting for King’s Landing since the second season.

So Dolphie didn’t just go to Croatia—he went to Westeros. And you know what? I’m just going to admit it: I’m jealous. A jealous nerdy nerd.

So who’s up for a study abroad program in the Seven Kingdoms?

AW80D: London Part 1

Statue

If New York City is the big apple, what large fruits or foods might the other great cities of the world be? Is London the giant mushy pea? (Actually, it’s The Old Smoke, but who’s counting anyway?) Considering the damp and general grayness (sound familiar?) which leads to brilliant green grasses, it might not be the most inaccurate moniker. Especially since The Emerald City is already taken.

One particular aspect of London that Dolphie focused on during his stop there was the transportation. The big red buses, the black cabs, the underground (aka the tube, which looking at the picture in the slideshow below now makes perfect sense)—I don’t quite get why, but London’s means of getting around sure seem to have a habit of becoming iconic.

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If you were a Londoner, how would you prefer to get around?

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and the Daily Mail, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Skopje, Macedonia

Stone Bridge D

In Skopje, a resident who shall remain anonymous said to Dolphie, there are now more statues than people. The capitol of Macedonia is investing in a reawakened sense of cultural heritage. Dolphie was able to visit many of these new stone and metal citizens.

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This national identity is not without controversy, however. See that statue of a guy on a horse? (You probably can’t tell, but that is 72 feet tall!) That’s Alexander the Great, who, as we all know, is from Macedonia. Except he’s from the historical Greek Kingdom of Macedon, and was born in what is now a town in Northern Greece. So is he Greek or Macedonian?

Actually, for that matter, is Macedonia really Macedonia?

This has been a contentious issue ever since Macedonia declared itself an independent country in 1991. Greece has been going to great lengths to protect what it believes to be its Macedonian heritage, even preventing the United Nations from recognizing Macedonia’s official name, the Republic of Macedonia, and instead labeling the country the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM). Another suggestion from Athens is that the entire country be called the Republic of Skopje.

The Washington Post got a quote from a Macedonian government official about the disagreement: “The Greeks are sorry that they are called Greece and not Macedonia. What else can I tell you?”

But Alexander the Great isn’t the only famous name that stirs up controversy among Macedonia and its neighbors.

Mother Teresa Plaque

Mother Teresa is also claimed by two countries: Macedonia and Albania. She was born in Skopje (which was then part of the Ottoman Empire), but was ethnically Albanian (there are still many ethnic Albanian citizens of Macedonia) and 24 years later moved to Albania.

These are disputes that no single Dolphin could settle. But there is also history of a less disputable nature in Skopje. People have lived in the area for at least 6,000 years, and the city itself was taken over by the Romans about 2,000 years ago.

Fort Skopje

This is Skopje Fortress. When exactly this incarnation of the fort was built is unknown, but it is at least about 400 years old. The first fort at this site was (probably) built during the reign of Emperor Justinian I (circa 550ish), who is sometimes referred to as Justinian the Great and called by some historians the Last Roman, which is also pretty awesome (and would make a great movie title, too!).

(You can see evidence of the dispute between Macedonia and Greece right here in this Google map! See how it says “Skopje, Macedonia FYROM”?)

After Macedonia, Dolphie only has one stop before returning once again to his native shores. And this time, it’s going to be personal! (You have to imagine that being said in the ominous movie preview guy’s voice.) Meaning, of course, that Dolphie’s last stop is not for business, but for pleasure. Where in the world do you think a dolphin would want to go most? (Hint: it’s in Europe.)

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia, Lonely Planet, and The Washington Post, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Belgrade, Serbia

Belgrade panorama

Belgrade‘s strategic location, where the Sava and Danube rivers meet, has made it an attractive prize to empires great and small for over 2,000 years. According to our friends over at The Independent, the city “was witness to 115 international conflicts and … razed to the ground 44 times.”

Given this history, it’s hard to decide whether it makes perfect sense or no sense at all that it is a prime party destination where live music can be found in smoky, crowded bars any night of the week. The oldest tavern in Belgrade is called ?. It got this unusual name when the cathedral that was next to it objected to the previous name, which was basically “Bar next to the cathedral.”

Oldest Cafe in Belgrade    Food 2

Despite having been at the center of so much conflict, there are some great historical buildings to be found in Belgrade (and now we all know that Dolphie is nuts for history!), including an old fortress right at the confluence of the two rivers, and a house built for a princess in the early 1800s that remains the best-preserved example of architecture from that period.

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Another interesting bit of history that you can find in Belgrade is the Nikola Tesla museum. Nikola Tesla was a Serbian-American inventor who moved to New York City to work for Thomas Edison. According to some, he is “the greatest geek who ever lived.” Of his many achievements, our favorite is probably creating one of the world’s first wirelessly controlled boats.

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia, Lonely Planet, and The Independent, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Panorama

Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina, is a cultural melange, a place where you can find a church, a synagogue, and a mosque all in one neighborhood. It is also the site of an assassination that changed the course of history.

Almost 101 years ago, on June 28, 1914 (which was both the Archduke’s wedding anniversary and the date of an important historical battle that marked the beginning of the fall of Serbia to the Turks—a sensitive date for Serbian nationalists), the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were touring Sarajevo, part of a territory that had been annexed by the Austro-Hungarian Empire, to which Ferdinand was the heir.

That day, there were two attempts on his life. In the first, a bomb was tossed into his car. It rolled off without harming the occupants. The second attempt was successful: Gavrilo Princip shot the Archduke and his wife at point blank range. Both were fatally injured and died within the hour.

This assassination sparked a series of events that led to the beginning of World War I. The shot was fired here:

Assassination Spot

(For all those who didn’t know, Dolphie is a serious history buff.)

More recently, Sarajevo was under siege for almost four years during the Bosnian War for Independence (1992-1995). During this time, there was frequent shelling, which resulted in mass death and destruction. Holes in streets caused by mortar shells were filled with red resin to mark the places that people were killed, and these became the Sarajevo Roses:

By Chrisreddy at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], from Wikimedia Commons

By Chrisreddy at English Wikipedia (Transferred from en.wikipedia) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 or GFDL], from Wikimedia Commons

Walking the paths of history is hungry work. Luckily, Sarajevo has a savory pastry snack that can satisfy even the hungriest dolphin: Burek.

Burek       People Eating

Burek is a savory phyllo dough pastry stuffed with meat and potatoes. Similar foods can be found anywhere that the Ottoman Empire had influence.

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(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and History.com, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)