Tag Archives: around the world in 80 Dolphies

AW80D: Zagreb, Croatia

D Opera House

Originally the site of a Roman town, Zagreb has a long and rich history. Today, it is also a bustling commercial and cultural center at the heart of one of Europe’s most up-and-coming tourist destinations.

Situated just across the Adriatic Sea from Italy, Croatia’s beaches and islands are already famous throughout Europe, especially among the yachting set. It’s no wonder: there’s a great combination of historical old towns and sun-drenched seas.

By Bracodbk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Bracodbk (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 or GFDL], via Wikimedia Commons

It’s so beautiful that we just had to include a picture that Dolphie didn’t take. He didn’t make it out to the coast on this trip because there’s so much to do in Zagreb! (Next time, though…)

Cathedral

Construction began on the Zagreb Cathedral in 1093, although it was once destroyed (by the Tatars) and once severely damaged (by an earthquake). It is the tallest building in Croatia, and possibly also the most photographed.

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(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and Lonely Planet, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Ljubljana, Slovenia

Riverside panorama

The land where Ljubljana now sits was originally settled about 4,000 years ago, and today is, according to Lonely Planet, “one of Europe’s greenest and most livable capitals.” It has a charming mix of architectural styles, from a couple of remnants from the Romans to Baroque and Vienna Secession.

You’ll certainly find, as Dolphie did, some of the most charming doorways you’ve ever seen. Which is weird, because we don’t really tend to think about doorways very much.

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(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and Lonely Planet, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Layover in Frankfurt

Deutsch Bull

After just a short rest, Dolphie is back on the road! These photos come from the airport in Frankfurt, where Dolphie had a layover en route to Slovenia (which you’ll hear more about later this week). For now, there’s one very important thing Dolphie wanted us to talk about with you all.

More Pretzels Pretzels

Pretzels. (Dolphie can’t get enough of them! Who knew?)

First, a small bit of history courtesy of Gretchen Gavett writing in the Harvard Business Review:

The history of the pretzel, of course, stretches through Germany and France. “It’s been around since 6 AD,” says Richard George, a professor of business administration and food marketing at Saint Joseph’s University. “If you were in Bavaria, you would get it everywhere.”

More than 2,000 years of glorious, crispy/chewy/salty goodness. Next time you’re enjoying a pretzel, meditate on the fact that you are taking a tasty journey back through the ages. And then dip that journey into a bit of good mustard.

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Harvard Business Review, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the link. Also, we feel much better about using Wikipedia as a reference now that we know that the Harvard Business Review does too.)

AW80D: Almaty, Kazakhstan

Almaty - Statue

You may not known this, but Almaty is poised to become one of the world’s great destinations for skiing. With some big, beautiful mountains a pretty good shot at the 2022 Winter Olympics, you’ll definitely be hearing more about this Central Asian hub soon.

Dolphie didn’t get a chance to do any skiing (which is just as well, since he doesn’t have any legs), but he did get a chance to see some of the sights.

Almaty - Wooden ChurchAlmaty - Church Park

This is the Zenkov Cathedral, a Russian Orthodox church that is built, down to the nails, entirely out of wood (I guess except for the windows—wooden windows wouldn’t work very well). In fact, it is the world’s second tallest wooden building. It is located in Panfilov Park, which is a popular spot for strolling among locals and visitors alike.

Almaty - Monument

Also in the park, Dolphie saw a war memorial that shows soldiers (fifteen of them, one for each of the Soviet republics) emerging from a map of the Soviet Union.

All of this sightseeing makes one hungry, so it was time to start hunting around for dinner options.

Almaty - McDoner

That looks familiar, right? The pictures to the right and left of the famous logo are of big spits of meat (usually beef and/or lamb). Doner kebab (yup, that’s where the name McDoner comes from) is make by slicing thin strips of meat off the spit, which are then served on a sandwich or in flatbread (like pita), usually with vegetables like lettuce, onion, and tomato. It is delicious. In Australia, it’s standard late night post-bar fare.

But Dolphie can’t support copyright violations, so he had to find something else to eat.

Almaty - Tea and BreadAlmaty - Dinner

Traditional Kazakh cuisine features a lot of meat, including horse meat. Although most Americans today would consider eating horse to be only slightly less amoral than eating dog (which is also eaten in many parts of the world), for many people, it’s just another kind of meat. Like kangaroo, ostrich, or snake (which, by the way, is delicious, especially when roasted).

Almaty - Dried Fruit

Because many people in Central Asia traditionally led a nomadic lifestyle, preserving foods has always been important. One method, of course, is drying. Dried apricots are particularly tasty.

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia, The Boston Globe, and Lonely Planet, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Amman, Jordan

Amman - View From RainbowAmman - Rainbow St Sign

With attractions ranging from beautiful mosques to trendy neighborhoods to Roman ruins, Amman is a city of contrasts, with a mixture of cultural influences. Lonely Planet calls Amman “a modern Arab city, embracing an international and culturally diverse vision of the future.”

The city is about 3,000 years old and was at different points in its long history controlled by the Assyrians, the Persians, the Macedonians (under whose control it was renamed Philadelphia), and the Romans, before eventually (and much more recently) becoming the capital of Jordan.

While there, Dolphie sampled some of the local fare: Hummus is a dip made from mashed chickpeas, tahini (sesame seed paste), lemon juice, olive oil, and garlic; Falafel is a deep-fried ball made of ground chickpeas and/or fava beans; Mansaf, called by some the national dish of Jordan, is “made of lamb cooked in a sauce of fermented dried yogurt and served with rice or bulgur.” Apparently the name of that last dish, Mansaf, literally translates to “large dish,” which reminds me of one of my favorite things to eat in China, 大盘鸡 (dàpánjī) which translates literally to “big plate chicken.”  Dolphie also got to see bread being baked in a traditional oven.

Along with very traditional food, he got a glimpse of the more modern art of graffit:

Amman - Graffiti

Unfortunately, this time around, there wasn’t time to see what most people consider to be Jordan’s premiere attraction.

By Berthold Werner (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Berthold Werner (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Petra is an ancient city carved beautifully out of red stone, and a UNESCO World Heritage site, which we’ve mentioned before are places you definitely want to see.

(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and Lonely Planet, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)

AW80D: Kuwait

Kuwait - Kuwait Tower

Kuwait was once a center of international trade, but now its economy is based primarily on oil, and it boasts the most highly-valued currency in the world, the Kuwaiti Dinar, one of which is worth (as of 4/2/15) $3.33 USD.

The most iconic structure in Kuwait, the Kuwait Towers, are part water towers, but also are home to a revolving cafe.

Dolphie got to do some shopping and dining in a traditional market on this leg of his journey, instead of a mall. The Souq al-Mubarakiya is a wonderful place to wander around and sample some of the local delicacies.

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(Two things: 1 – AW80D stands for Around the World in 80 Dolphies, wherein we follow the international adventures of Dolphie, mascot of Shoreline Community College; 2 – Credit where credit’s due, so thanks Wikipedia and Lonely Planet, and if you’d like to see where I got my information, just click the links.)