Tag Archives: teach in china

World Traveler Problems #37

By Zhangzhugang (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Zhangzhugang (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Waking up one day and realizing that you’ve been in Yangshuo for almost a month when your original plan was to stay for a weekend. #worldtravelerproblems

By chensiyuan (chensiyuan) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By chensiyuan (chensiyuan) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Ericbolz (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

By Ericbolz (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Earn $500 an Hour Writing Essays!

Come to the Shoreline Study Abroad Information Session on Tuesday, February 10 from 12:30 – 1:30 in PUB 9208 (Quiet Dining Room) and learn about our study abroad programs and how to apply for scholarships to pay for them! Nobody will give you money to travel just for writing an essay after you’ve graduated!

Second and Final Chance for Teach in China Info Session

Tomorrow (1/22) from 3:00 – 4:00 in PUB 9202, learn how to get paid to see the world, or to learn about life as an English teacher in China. (Also, see the world’s most poorly planned sign, made almost entirely of printer paper and scotch tape, located in the main area of the PUB. Comments welcome.)

Lunar New Year Celebration at Shoreline!

Come join International Education to celebrate Lunar New Year (aka Spring Festival, aka Chinese New Year)! We’ll be having a dumpling tasting, as well as a demonstration of how to make them.

By Bioniclepluslotr (I took a picture of food I cooked.) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Chinese Dumplings. By Bioniclepluslotr (I took a picture of food I cooked.) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Dumplings (饺子 in simplified Chinese, pronounced jiǎozi) are a traditional food to eat on Lunar New Year in northern China. Their shape resembles an ancient Chinese currency, and the fact that they are stuffed with deliciousness suggests a new year full of good fortune. (At least this is what people told me.)

By avlxyz from (Flickr) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Stir-fried Rice Cakes. By avlxyz from (Flickr) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

In southern China, where I lived, we were always sure to eat rice cakes (年糕, pronounced nián gāo, which are not like cake at all, by the way) and fish during our Lunar New Year dinner, as well as all kinds of seafood. We would usually finish the meal with Longevity Noodles (长寿面, pronounced chángshòu miàn). Long noodles for long life!

Longevity Noodles

Longevity Noodles. By Jun (originally posted to Flickr as 中碗的乾拌麵) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

And remember, if you want to see China for yourself, you have a brilliant opportunity to do it and get paid through the Teach in China program! Contact us for more information at studyabroad@shoreline.edu.

Teach in China

The most frequent question I get about studying abroad is: Can I find a burger with bacon and mashed potatoes on it in [name of desired study abroad destination]?

I bet that wasn’t what you expected. Probably because I just made it up. Actually, the question you most likely guessed would come up most is the one I get asked almost every time I talk to a student about studying abroad: How am I going to pay for it?

Generally, the answer involves financial aid, scholarships, student loans—there are many ways to pay for study abroad, every single one of them absolutely worth it. But some people just can’t make it happen. Does the conversation end there?

No.

For those who want to get out and see the world, there are options. Shoreline is one of a group of schools that works with Seattle Central College to offer the Teach in China program. Working with an education group based in Yangshuo, China (an amazingly beautiful place—a friend of mine planned to just pass through there, but ended up staying for almost a month), students spend a semester teaching English in a Chinese school. They are provided fully furnished apartments and paid a monthly salary of 4,500 RMB (which as of today is $724.11) for teaching 15 hours per week (probably working about 20-25 hours per week, including prep time).

This is plenty of money to live on in most parts of China. Especially since you don’t have to pay rent. You can read more about the program here, and of course contact me at studyabroad@shoreline.edu if you have any questions. I spent seven years teaching English in China, and I strongly encourage others to try it out.

And yeah, you can get a burger with bacon and mashed potatoes on it. At McDonald’s.SAMSUNG